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  • 1.
    Abdel-Karim, R.
    et al.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Reda, Y.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Muhammed, Mamoun A.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    El-Raghy, S.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Shoeib, M.
    Metals Technology Department Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute.
    Ahmed, H.
    Department of Metallurgy, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University.
    Electrodeposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Ni-Fe Alloys2011In: Journal of Nanomaterials, ISSN 1687-4110, E-ISSN 1687-4129, p. 519274-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Fe deposits with different composition and grain sizes were fabricated by electrodeposition. Deposits with iron contents in the range from 7 to 31% were obtained by changing the Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) mass ratio in the electrolyte. The deposits were found to be nanocrystalline with average grain size in the range 20-30 nm. The surface morphology was found to be dependent on Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) mass ratio as well as electroplating time. The grains size decreased with increasing the iron content, especially in case of short time electroplating. Increasing the electroplating time had no significant effect on grain size. The microhardness of the materials followed the regular Hall-Petch relationship with amaximum value (762 Hv) when applying Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) mass ratio equal to 9.8.

  • 2. Abderrazek, K.
    et al.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Seffen, M.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Srasra, N. Frini
    Srasra, E.
    Photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine using [Zn-Al] LDH supported on PAN nanofibres2015In: Clay minerals, ISSN 0009-8558, E-ISSN 1471-8030, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 185-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDH), before and after calcination, were tested for the removal of indigo carmine (IC) dye from solution. These LDH photocatalysts were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry/differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), nitrogen physisorption at -196 degrees C, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry (DRS). The different photocatalysts were supported on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibres, so that filtration was unnecessary. The PXRD and FTIR analyses showed that the IC adsorption on c-Zn-Al-3-500 (LDH calcined at 500 degrees C) was enhanced by construction of the hydrotalcite matrix intercalated with the dye. The intercalation was clearly evidenced by the appearance of a peak at low degrees 2 theta values. All of the materials prepared exhibited photocatalytic activity, which for the c-Zn-Al-3-500 was comparable to that of commercial PAN-supported ZnO nanoparticles (100% degradation after 180 min). Kinetic studies showed that the degradation of the IC followed a pseudo-first order rate. The high activity and the ease of both synthesis and separation processes rendered this photocatalyst a promising candidate for environmental remediation.

  • 3.
    Afrasiabi, Roodabeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Shahid, Robina
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Microwave mediated synthesis of semiconductor quantum dots2012In: Physica Status Solidi. C, Current topics in solid state physics, ISSN 1610-1634, E-ISSN 1610-1642, Vol. 9, no 7, p. 1551-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colloidal quantum dots (QD) have tuneable optoelectronic properties and can be easily handled by simple solution processing techniques, making them very attractive for a wide range of applications. Over the past decade synthesis of morphology controlled high quality (crystalline, monodisperse) colloidal QDs by thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors has matured and is well studied. Recently, synthesis of colloidal QDs by microwave irradiation as heating source is being studied due to the inherently different mechanisms of heat transfer, when compared to solvent convection based heating. Under microwave irradiation, polar precursor molecules directly absorb the microwave energy and heat up more efficiently. Here we report synthesis of colloidal II-VI semiconductor QDs (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) by microwave irradiation and compare it with conventional synthesis based on convection heating. Our findings show that QD synthesis by microwave heating is more efficient and the chalcogenide precursor strongly absorbs the microwave radiation shortening the reaction time and giving a high reaction yield.

  • 4.
    Asem, Heba
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Abd El-Fattah, Ahmed
    Nafee, Noha
    Zhao, Ying
    Khalil, Labiba
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Kandil, Sherif
    Development and biodistribution of a theranostic aluminum phthalocyanine nanophotosensitizer2016In: Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy, ISSN 1572-1000, E-ISSN 1873-1597, Vol. 13, p. 48-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) is an efficient second generation photosensitizer (PS) with high fluorescence ability. Its use in photodynamic therapy (PDT) is hampered by hydrophobicity and poor biodistribution. Methods: AlPc was converted to a biocompatible nanostructure by incorporation into amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (PECL) copolymer nanoparticles, allowing efficient entrapment of the PS in the hydrophobic core, water dispersibility and biodistribution enhancement by PEG-induced surface characteristics. A series of synthesized PECL copolymers were used to prepare nanophotosensitizers with an average diameter of 66.5-99.1 nm and encapsulation efficiency (EE%) of 66.4-78.0%. One formulation with favorable colloidal properties and relatively slow release over 7 days was selected for in vitro photophysical assessment and in vivo biodistribution studies in mice. Results: The photophysical properties of AlPc were improved by encapsulating AlPc into PECL-NPs, which showed intense fluorescence emission at 687 nm and no AlPc aggregation has been induced after entrapment into the nanoparticles. Biodistribution of AlPc loaded NPs (AlPc-NPs) and free AlPc drug in mice was monitored by in vivo whole body fluorescence imaging and ex vivo organ imaging, with in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Compared to a AlPc solution in aqueous TWEEN 80 (2 w/v%), the developed nanophotosensitizer showed targeted drug delivery to lungs, liver and spleen as monitored by the intrinsic fluorescence of AlPc at different time points (1 h, 24 h and 48 h) post iv. administration. Conclusions: The AlPc-based copolymer nanoparticles developed offer potential as a single agent multifunctional theranostic nanophotosensitizer for PDT coupled with imaging-guided drug delivery and biodistribution, and possibly also fluorescence diagnostics.

  • 5.
    Asem, Heba
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Karolinska Institutet (KI), Sweden.
    Zhao, Ying
    Ye, Fei
    Barrefelt, Asa
    Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr
    El-Sayed, Ramy
    El-Serafi, Ibrahim
    Abu-Salah, Khalid M.
    Hamm, Jorg
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Biodistribution of biodegradable polymeric nano-carriers loaded with busulphan and designed for multimodal imaging2016In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology, E-ISSN 1477-3155, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multifunctional nanocarriers for controlled drug delivery, imaging of disease development and follow-up of treatment efficacy are promising novel tools for disease diagnosis and treatment. In the current investigation, we present a multifunctional theranostic nanocarrier system for anticancer drug delivery and molecular imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as an MRI contrast agent and busulphan as a model for lipophilic antineoplastic drugs were encapsulated into poly (ethylene glycol)-co-poly (caprolactone) (PEG-PCL) micelles via the emulsion-evaporation method, and PEG-PCL was labelled with VivoTag 680XL fluorochrome for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Results: Busulphan entrapment efficiency was 83% while the drug release showed a sustained pattern over 10 h. SPION loaded-PEG-PCL micelles showed contrast enhancement in T-2*-weighted MRI with high r(2)* relaxivity. In vitro cellular uptake of PEG-PCL micelles labeled with fluorescein in J774A cells was found to be time-dependent. The maximum uptake was observed after 24 h of incubation. The biodistribution of PEG-PCL micelles functionalized with VivoTag 680XL was investigated in Balb/c mice over 48 h using in vivo fluorescence imaging. The results of real-time live imaging were then confirmed by ex vivo organ imaging and histological examination. Generally, PEG-PCL micelles were highly distributed into the lungs during the first 4 h post intravenous administration, then redistributed and accumulated in liver and spleen until 48 h post administration. No pathological impairment was found in the major organs studied. Conclusions: Thus, with loaded contrast agent and conjugated fluorochrome, PEG-PCL micelles as biodegradable and biocompatible nanocarriers are efficient multimodal imaging agents, offering high drug loading capacity, and sustained drug release. These might offer high treatment efficacy and real-time tracking of the drug delivery system in vivo, which is crucial for designing of an efficient drug delivery system.

  • 6.
    Ashour, Radwa M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Nuclear Materials Authority, Egypt.
    El-sayed, R.
    Abdel-Magied, A. F.
    Abdel-khalek, A. A.
    Ali, M. M.
    Forsberg, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Dutta, Joydeep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Selective separation of rare earth ions from aqueous solution using functionalized magnetite nanoparticles: kinetic and thermodynamic studies2017In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 327, p. 286-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Separation of rare earth ions (RE3+) from aqueous solution is a tricky problem due to their physico-chemical similarities of properties. In this study, we investigate the influence of the functionalized ligands on the adsorption efficiency and selective adsorption of La3+, Nd3+, Gd3+ and Y3+ from aqueous solution using Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with citric acid (CA@Fe3O4 NPs) or L-cysteine (Cys@Fe3O4 NPs). The microstructure, thermal behavior and surface functionalization of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied. The general adsorption capacity of Cys@Fe3O4 NPs was found to be high (98 mg g−1) in comparison to CA@Fe3O4 NPs (52 mg g−1) at neutral pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption of RE3+ ions follows a pseudo second-order model and the adsorption equilibrium data fits well to the Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic studies imply that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Controlled desorption within 30 min of the adsorbed RE3+ ions from both Cys@Fe3O4 NPs and CA@Fe3O4 NPs was achieved with 0.5 M HNO3. Furthermore, Cys@Fe3O4 NPs exhibited a higher separation factor (SF) in the separation of Gd3+/La3+, Gd3+/Nd3+, Gd3+/Y3+ ions compared to CA@Fe3O4 NPs.

  • 7.
    Avila, Marta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Burks, Terrance
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Akhtar, F.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm Universtiy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Göthelid, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Lansåker, P. C.
    Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Surface functionalized nanofibers for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions2014In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 245, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers functionalized with amine groups (PAN-NH2) were prepared using a simple one-step reaction route. The PAN-NH2 nanofibers were investigated for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption and the kinetic characteristics were evaluated in batch process. The adsorption process showed pH dependence and the maximum Cr(VI) adsorption occurred at pH = 2. The Langmuir adsorption model described well the experimental adsorption data and estimated a maximum loading capacity of 156 mg/g, which is a markedly high value compared to other adsorbents reported. The kinetics studies indicated that the equilibrium was attained after 90 min and the experimental data followed a pseudo-second order model suggesting a chemisorption process as the rate limiting step. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) revealed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) species on PAN-NH2 was facilitated through both electrostatic attraction and surface complexation. High desorption efficiency (> 90%) of Cr(VI) was achieved using diluted base solutions that may allow the reuse of PAN-NH2 nanofibers.

  • 8. Aziz, F.
    et al.
    Ouazzani, N.
    Mandi, L.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Composite nanofibers of polyacrylonitrile/natural clay for decontamination of water containing Pb(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and pesticides2017In: Separation science and technology (Print), ISSN 0149-6395, E-ISSN 1520-5754, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 58-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite nanofibers containing polyacrylonitrile and natural clay particles were fabricated and investigated for the removal of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) can be well described by the Langmuir adsorption model and high loading capacities at pH 7 were obtained. The kinetics of the adsorption process showed that equilibrium was attained after 60 min and the experimental data followed a pseudo-first-order model. The nanocomposites were also tested for photocatalytic degradation of Monocrotophos pesticides in which high degradation efficiency (>90%) was obtained in less than 60 min.

  • 9. Barrefelt, Åsa
    et al.
    Paradossi, Gaio
    Asem, Heba
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Margheritelli, Silvia
    Saghafian, Maryam
    Oddo, Letizia
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Aspelin, Peter
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    DYNAMIC MR IMAGING, BIODISTRIBUTION AND PHARMACOKINETICS OF POLYMER SHELLED MICROBUBBLES CONTAINING SPION2014In: NANO, ISSN 1793-2920, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 1450069-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive diagnostic method that provides information on morphological and physiological changes of the internal organs over time. Imaging and measurements can be repeated on the same subject, thereby reducing inter-individual variability effects and hence the number of subjects required. A potential MRI contrast agent consisting of microbubbles embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in the shell (SPION MBs) was injected intravenously into rats to determine their biodistribution and pharmacokinetics using MR imaging. Agarose phantoms containing SPION MBs were scanned using 3 T MRI to construct a standard curve. Rats were injected with SPION MBs, free SPION or plain MBs and scanned dynamically at 3 T using a clinical MR scanner. The relaxation rate (R2*) was studied over time as a measure of the iron oxide concentrations to enable calculation of the pharmacokinetic parameters. The kinetics of SPION MBs in the liver was fitted to a one-compartment model. Furthermore, the biological fate of SPION MBs was examined via a histological survey of tissue samples using Perls' Prussian blue staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC). 1.2 h after injection of SPION MBs, T2* of the liver had decreased to its minimum. The elimination half-life of SPION MBs was 598.2 +/- 97.3 h, while the half-life for SPION was 222.6 +/- 26.4 h. Moreover, our study showed that SPION MBs were taken up by the macrophages in the lungs, spleen and liver. MBs labeled with SPION can be used for MR imaging. Moreover, MRI is a reliable and noninvasive tool that can be utilized in pharmacokinetic investigations of future contrast agents using SPION MBs and SPION in the rat.

  • 10. Barrefelt, Åsa
    et al.
    Saghafian, Maryam
    Kuiper, Raoul
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Egri, Gabriella
    Klickermann, Moritz
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    Aspelin, Peter
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Daehne, Lars
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Biodistribution, kinetics, and biological fate of SPION microbubbles in the rat2013In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 8, p. 3241-3254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the present investigation, we studied the kinetics and biodistribution of a contrast agent consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) microbubbles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION) trapped between the PVA layers (SPION microbubbles). Methods: The biological fate of SPION microbubbles was determined in Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous administration. Biodistribution and elimination of the microbubbles were studied in rats using magnetic resonance imaging for a period of 6 weeks. The rats were sacrificed and perfusion-fixated at different time points. The magnetic resonance imaging results obtained were compared with histopathologic findings in different organs. Results: SPION microbubbles could be detected in the liver using magnetic resonance imaging as early as 10 minutes post injection. The maximum signal was detected between 24 hours and one week post injection. Histopathology showed the presence of clustered SPION microbubbles predominantly in the lungs from the first time point investigated (10 minutes). The frequency of microbubbles declined in the pulmonary vasculature and increased in pulmonary, hepatic, and splenic macrophages over time, resulting in a relative shift from the lungs to the spleen and liver. Meanwhile, macrophages showed increasing signs of cytoplasmic iron accumulation, initially in the lungs, then followed by other organs. Conclusion: The present investigation highlights the biological behavior of SPION microbubbles, including organ distribution over time and indications for biodegradation. The present results are essential for developing SPION microbubbles as a potential contrast agent and/or a drug delivery vehicle for specific organs. Such a vehicle will facilitate the use of multimodality imaging techniques, including ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and single positron emission computed tomography, and hence improve diagnostics, therapy, and the ability to monitor the efficacy of treatment.

  • 11.
    Bitaraf Haghighi, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Behi, Mohammadreza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Mirmohammadi, Seyed Aliakbar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Poth, H.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Shelf stability of nanofluids and its effect on thermal conductivity and viscosity2013In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 105301-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a method and apparatus to estimate shelf stability of nanofluids. Nanofluids are fabricated by dispersion of solid nanoparticles in base fluids, and shelf stability is a key issue for many practical applications of these fluids. In this study, shelf stability is evaluated by measuring the weight of settled solid particles on a suspended tray in a colloid versus time and correlated with the performance change of some nanofluid systems. The effects of solid particle concentration and bath sonication time were investigated for selected nanofluids. The results show the applicability of this simple method and the apparatus to evaluate nanofluid shelf stability. Furthermore, it shows that Stokes' law is not valid for determining the settling time of the tested nanoparticles probably due to their complicated shape and presence of surface modifiers. The effect of shelf stability on thermal conductivity and viscosity was illustrated for some nanofluids. Experimental results show that water-based Al2O3 nanofluids have quite good shelf stability and can be good candidates for industrial applications.

  • 12.
    Bitaraf Haghighi, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Anwar, Zahid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Lumbreras, Itziar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Behi, Mohammadreza
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Mirmohammadi, Seyed A.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Poth, Heiko
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Cooling performance of nanofluids in a small diameter tube2013In: Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, ISSN 0894-1777, E-ISSN 1879-2286, Vol. 49, p. 114-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports convective single-phase heat transfer performance in laminar flow for some selected nanofluids (NFs) in an open small diameter test section. A 0.50 mm inner diameter, 30 cm long stainless steel test section was used for screening single phase laminar convective heat transfer with water and five different water based NFs. Tested NFs were; Al2O3 (two types), TiO2 (two types) and CeO2 (one type), all 9 wt.% particle concentration. The effective thermal conductivity of the NFs were measured with Transient Plane Source (TPS) method and viscosity were measured with a rotating coaxial cylindrical viscometer. The obtained experimental results for thermal conductivity were in good agreement with the predicted values from Maxwell equation. The local Shah correlation, which is conventionally used for predicting convective heat transfer in laminar flow in Newtonian fluids with constant heat flux boundary condition, was shown to be valid for NFs. Moreover, the Darcy correlation was used to predict the friction factor for the NFs as well as for water. Enhancement in heat transfer for NFs was observed, when compared at equal Reynolds number, as a result of higher velocity or mass flow rate of the NFs at any given Reynolds number due to higher viscosity for NFs. However, when compared at equal pumping power no or only minor enhancement was observed.

  • 13.
    Bitaraf Haghighi, Ehsan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Ghadamgahi, Mersedeh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Measurement of temperature–dependent viscosity of nanofluids and its effect on pumping power in cooling systems2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids of nanoparticlesdispersed homogenously in a base fluid, which theirthermophysical properties are changed by adding solidnanoparticles. Among the characteristic parameters,viscosity is one of the most important, as it directly affectsthe pumping power in cooling systems. In this study, theviscosity of water based Al2O3, ZrO2, and TiO2 (with 9wt%for all) nanofluids was measured and its impact on pressuredrop in a simple tubular pipe was estimated for bothlaminar and turbulent flow by classical correlations. Theeffect of temperature on the viscosity of these nanofluidswas also studied in the temperature range of 5˚C - 30˚C. Toassess the applicability of the classical correlations, pressuredrops across an open 30cm long, 0.50mm diameterstainless steel test section was measured for water andnanofluids by a differential pressure transducer. Theaverage viscosity increments compared to water in thetemperature range of 5˚C - 30˚C are 105%, 98% and 31% forAl2O3, ZrO2, and TiO2 nanofluids respectively. Moreover, theresults show that the viscosity of nanofluids decreases withthe increase of temperature; however the relative viscosity,which is defined as the viscosity ratio between a nanofluidand its base fluid is constant in 5˚C - 30˚C temperaturerange.

  • 14.
    Burks, Terrance
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Avila, Marta
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Akhtar, F.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Götelid, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Lansåker, P. C.
    Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Studies on the adsorption of chromium(VI) onto 3-Mercaptopropionic acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles2014In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 425, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chromium (Cr) in the form of Cr(VI) is deemed toxic in water due to its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. For the successful removal of Cr(VI), we demonstrate a novel adsorbent consisting of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) functionalized with 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the functionalization of nanoparticles and presence of sulfonate groups. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the functionalized adsorbent recovered 45 mg of Cr(VI)/g of 3-MPA coated SPION at initial concentration of 50 mg/L aqueous solution at pH 1 with less than 1% of Fe dissolution from SPION. The results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that Cr(VI) chemisorbed onto the adsorbent. Hence, the XPS spectra did not indicate any reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) upon adsorption. The adsorption data were better fitted for the Freundlich model. Moreover, the Cr(VI) adsorption kinetics on functionalized SPION followed a pseudo-second order rate, revealing chemisorption as the dominant mechanism. The high Cr(VI) removal, rapid adsorption kinetics and stability of adsorbent indicate that 3-MPA coated SPION could be an efficient adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI).

  • 15.
    Burks, Terrance
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Eita, Mohamed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Removal of Chromium(VI) Using Surface Modified Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles2013In: Separation science and technology (Print), ISSN 0149-6395, E-ISSN 1520-5754, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 1243-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes the removal of Chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions using surface tailored superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) coated with bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex-301). The synthesized Cyanex-301 coated SPION has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier-Transfer Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray Photonic Spectroscopy (XPS), and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The adsorption mechanism was proposed to be via complexation between the thiol group on Cyanex-301 and Cr(VI) ions based on the XPS and FTIR analysis. It has been found that the equilibrium can be attained in less than 2hr. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) on the Cyanex-301 coated SPION can be well described by the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was estimated to be 30.8mg/g. The selectivity of the Cyanex-301 coated SPION adsorbent towards Cr(VI) ions was found to be high and the maximum loading capacity obtained is up to an order of magnitude higher than that of other adsorbents reported in the literature. The desorption studies showed that more than 70% of Cr(VI) can be recovered using HNO3 as eluting solution. Our findings suggest a high potential of the designed adsorbent material for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing Cr(VI).

  • 16.
    Dai, Jin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Chen, Yiting
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Qiu, Min
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics.
    Yan, Min
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics.
    Light absorber based on nano-spheres on a substrate reflector2013In: Optics Express, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 6697-6706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We systematically study a type of plasmonic light absorber based on a monolayer of gold nano-spheres with less than 30 nm in diameters deposited on top of a continuous gold substrate. The influences of particle size, inter-particle distance, particle-substrate spacer size etc on the resonance are studied thoroughly with a 3D finite-element method. We identified that the high-absorption resonance is mainly due to gap plasmon (coupled through particle bodies) when the separation between neighboring nano-spheres is small enough, such as close to 1 nm; at larger particle separations, the resonance is dominated by particle dipoles (coupled through the host dielectric). Experimentally, an absorber was fabricated based on chemically-synthesized gold nanoparticles coated with silica shell. The absorber shows a characteristic absorption band around 810 nm with a maximum absorbance of approximately 90%, which agrees reasonably well with our numerical calculation. The fabrication technique can be easily adapted for devising efficient light absorbers of large areas.

  • 17.
    Dong, Lin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hu, Jun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Zhou, Sicheng
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Friberg, Ari T.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Photoluminescence from quasi-type-II spherical CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots2013In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spherical CdSe-CdS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) are found to be flexible in the transition between the type-I regime and the type-II regime with different core/shell dimensions. The quasi-type-II feature of the colloidal dots is confirmed with time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Two recombination paths of the excitons with significantly different decay rates are observed and analyzed. The spherical CdSe-CdS core-shell QDs are numerically simulated to investigate the carrier separation. A relatively long radiative lifetime and high degree of spatial carrier separation provide good potential to achieve lasing under continuous-wave excitation. Amplified spontaneous emission at room temperature is detected from the QDs embedded in the polymer matrix. It is shown that a larger shell thickness results in a lower pumping threshold, while a smaller shell thickness leads to higher PL efficiency.

  • 18.
    Dong, Lin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Chughtai, Adnan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Liuolia, Vytautas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Friberg, Ari T.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Lasing From Water Solution of Rhodamine 6G/Gold Nanoparticles: Impact of SiO2-Coating on Metal Surface2012In: IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics, ISSN 0018-9197, E-ISSN 1558-1713, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1220-1226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gold nanoparticles embedded in an optical gain material, particularly in a water solution of Rhodamine 6G, used in dye lasers can both increase and damp dye flourescence, thus changing the laser output intensity. Simultaneously, such nanoparticles influence the gain material's resistance against photobleaching. In this paper, we report our study on the impact of the SiO2 coating of nanoparticles on the enhancement or quenching and photobleaching of the fluorescence. The investigation demonstrates a noticeable improvement of the gain material's photostability compared to uncoated gold nanoparticles when silicon dioxide coating is implemented.

  • 19.
    Dong, Lin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Chughtai, Adnan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Friberg, Ari T.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Enhanced photostability of aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G with gold nanoparticles in lasing process by silica coating2012In: 2012 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO 2012, IEEE , 2012, p. 6325399-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gold nanoparticles are mixed in aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G to modify the lasing output intensity. The photostability deterioration of the gain medium by gold nanoparticles is successfully compensated by silica coating on the nanoparticles.

  • 20.
    Dong, Lin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Chughtai, Adnan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Friberg, Ari T.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Photostability of lasing process from water solution of Rhodamine 6G with gold nanoparticles2012In: Optics Letters, ISSN 0146-9592, E-ISSN 1539-4794, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 34-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the lasing performance and photobleaching of gain material containing a water solution of Rhodamine 6G dye and gold nanoparticles (NPs). In comparison to a pure dye solution, the investigated material demonstrated both enhancement and quenching of the lasing output, depending on the relative concentration of the gold NPs. Although the presence of NPs with an optimized concentration looks preferable in terms of the lasing output enhancement, such additives deteriorate the operational resource of the gain material; i.e., the photobleaching rate speeds up.

  • 21.
    Dong, Lin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hu, Jun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Friberg, Ari T.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Optics and Photonics, Optics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Fluorescence quenching and photobleaching in Au/Rh6G nanoassemblies: impact of competition between radiative and non-radiative decay2011In: Journal of the European Optical Society-Rapid Publications, E-ISSN 1990-2573, Vol. 6, p. 11019-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the study of fluorescence quenching from nanoassemblies formed by Rhodamine 6G and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of 2.6 nm radius. The presence of Au NPs induces long-term degradation of the photostability (photobleaching) of Rhodamine 6G used as a gain medium in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. We found that the degradation gets profound when the Au NPs concentration is significantly increased. Calculation of the radiative rate and direct time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence decay indicates that both the decrease of radiative decay rate and increase of non-radiative decay rate are responsible for the fluorescence quenching and photostability degradation. An energy transfer from the dye molecules to gold nanoparticles is dominating within small distance between them and suppresses the quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G drastically. In a long time scale, the photobleaching rate was slowing down, and the laser output intensity reached a stabilized level which depends on the gold nanoparticles concentration.

  • 22.
    Eita, Mohamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    El Sayed, Ramy
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Optical properties of thin films of zinc oxide quantum dots and polydimethylsiloxane: UV-blocking and the effect of cross-linking2012In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 387, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and ZnO quantum dots (QDs) were built up as multilayers by spin-coating. The films are characterized by a UV-blocking ability that increases with increasing number of bilayers. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of the thin films occur at 522 nm, which is the PL wavelength of the ZnO QDs dispersion, but with a lower intensity and a quantum yield (QY) less than 1% that of the dispersion. Cross-linking has introduced new features to the absorption spectra in that the absorption peak was absent. These changes were attributed to the morphological and structural changes revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. TEM showed that the ZnO particle size in the film increased from 7 (+/- 2.7) nm to 16 (+/- 7.8) upon cross-linking. The FTIR spectra suggest that ZnO QDs are involved in the cross-linking of PDMS and that the surface of the ZnO QDs has been chemically modified.

  • 23.
    Eita, Mohamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Wagberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Spin-Assisted Multilayers of Poly(methyl methacrylate) and Zinc Oxide Quantum Dots for Ultraviolet-Blocking Applications2012In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 2920-2925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin UV-blocking films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and ZnO quantum dots (QDs) were built-up by spin-coating. Ellipsometry reveals average thicknesses of 9.5 and 8.6 nm per bilayer before and after heating at 100 degrees C for one hour, respectively. The surface roughness measured by Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was 3.6 and 8.4 nm for the one and ten bilayer films, respectively. The linear increase in thickness as well as the low surface roughness increment per bilayer indicates a stratified multilayer structure and a smooth interface without: aggregation. The absorption of UV radiation increased with increasing number of bilayers. At the same time, transmission was damped at wavelengths shorter than 375 nm. The thin films had a high and constant transparency in the visible region. Green-light emitting QDs could be detected by confocal microscopy at a concentration of 20% in a single layer of PMMA/ZnO. PMMA/ZnO QDs thin films are hydrophobic, as indicated by contact angle measurements.

  • 24.
    Eita, Mohamed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Wagberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Thin Films of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Poly(acrylic acid) Fabricated by the Layer-by-Layer Technique: a Facile Platform for Outstanding Properties2012In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 116, no 7, p. 4621-4627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incorporation of nanoparticles into polyelectrolytes thin films opens the way to a broad range of applications depending on the functionality of the nanoparticles. In this work, thin films of ZnO nanoparticles and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were built up using the layer-by-layer technique. The thickness of a 20-bilayer film is about 120 nm with a surface roughness of 22.9 nm as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thin ZnO/PAA films block UV radiation starting at a wavelength of 361 nm due to absorption by ZnO although the films are highly transparent. Due to their high porosity, these thin films show a broadband antireflection in the visible region, and thus they provide selective opacity in the UV region and enhanced transmittance in the visible region up to the near-infrared region. They are also superhydrophilic due to their high porosity and surface roughness.

  • 25.
    El-Sayed, R.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Expt Canc Med, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Waraky, A.
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Lab Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ezzat, K.
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Albabtain, R.
    King Saud Univ, Coll Appl Med Sci, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Elgammal, Karim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Shityakov, S.
    Univ Hosp Wilrzburg, Dept Anesthesia & Crit Care, Wurzburg, Germany..
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH.
    Hassan, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Expt Canc Med, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Clin Res Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Degradation of pristine and oxidized single wall carbon nanotubes by CYP3A42019In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 515, no 3, p. 487-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a class of carbon based nanomaterials which have attracted substantial attention in recent years as they exhibit outstanding physical, mechanical and optical properties. In the last decade many studies have emerged of the underlying mechanisms behind CNT toxicity including malignant transformation, the formation of granulomas, inflammatory responses, oxidative stress, DNA damage and mutation. In the present investigation, we studied the biodegradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4) through using Raman spectroscopy. CYP3A4 is known isozyme accountable for metabolizing various endogenous and exogenous xenobiotics. CYP3A4 is expressed dominantly in the liver and other organs including the lungs. Our results suggest that CYP3A4 has a higher affinity for p-SWNTs compared to c-SWNTs. HEK293 cellular viability was not compromised when incubated with SWNT. However, CYP3A4 transfected HEK293 cell line showed no digestion of cSWNTs after incubation for 96 h. Cellular uptake of c-SWNTs was observed by electron microscopy and localization of c-SWNTs was confirmed in endosomal vesicles and in the cytoplasm. This is the first study CYP3A4 degrading both p-SWNTs and c-SWNTs in an in vitro setup. Interestingly, our results show that CYP3A4 is more proficient in degrading p-SWNTs than c-SWNTs. We also employed computational modeling and docking assessments to develop a further understanding of the molecular interaction mechanism. 

  • 26. El-Sayed, R.
    et al.
    Ye, F.
    Asem, Heba
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Ashour, Radwa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zheng, W.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Alexandria University, Egypt.
    Hassan, M.
    Importance of the surface chemistry of nanoparticles on peroxidase-like activity2017In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 491, no 1, p. 15-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the studies on origin of peroxidase-like activity for gold nanoparticles, as well as the impact from morphology and surface charge of nanoparticles. For this purpose, we have synthesized hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) and gold nanorods (AuNR) with different morphology and surface chemistry to investigate their influence on the catalytic activity. We found that citrate-capped HAuNS show catalyzing efficiency in oxidation reaction of 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and it is superior to that of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped AuNR. The kinetics of catalytic activities from HAuNS and AuNR were respectively studied under varied temperatures. The results indicated that surface chemistry rather than morphology of nanoparticles plays an important role in the catalytic reaction of substrate. Furthermore, influencing factors such as pH, amount of nanoparticle and H2O2 concentration were also investigated on HAuNS-catalyzed system. The great impact of nanoparticle surface properties on catalytic reactions makes a paradigm in constructing nanozymes as peroxidase mimic for sensing application.

  • 27. El-Sayed, Ramy
    et al.
    Eita, Mohamed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Barrefelt, Åsa
    Ye, Fei
    Jain, Himanshu
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Fares, Mona
    Lundin, Arne
    Crona, Mikael
    Abu-Salah, Khalid
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Thermostable Luciferase from Luciola cruciate for Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Nanotubes Carrying Doxorubicin Using in Vivo Imaging System2013In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 1393-1398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we introduce a novel method for in vivo imaging of the biodistribution of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) labeled with recombinant thermo-stable Luciola cruciata luciferase (LcL). In addition, we highlight a new application for green fluorescent proteins in which they are utilized as imaging moieties for SWNTs. Carbon nanotubes show great positive potential compared to other drug nanocarriers with respect to loading capacity, cell internalization, and biodegradability. We have also studied the effect of binding mode (chemical conjugation and physical adsorption) on the chemiluminescence activity, decay rate, and half-life. We have shown that through proper chemical conjugation of LcL to CNTs, LcL remained biologically active for the catalysis of D-luciferin in the presence of ATP to release detectable amounts of photons for in vivo imaging. Chemiluminescence of LcL allows imaging of CNTs and their cargo in nonsuperficial locations at an organ resolution with no need of an excitation source. Loading LcL-CNTs with the antitumor antibiotic doxorubicin did not alter their biological activity for imaging. In vivo imaging of LcL-CNTs has been carried out using "IVIS spectrum" showing the uptake of LcL-CNTs by different organs in mice. We believe that the LcL-CNT system is an advanced powerful tool for in vivo imaging and therefore a step toward the advancement of the nanomellicine field.

  • 28. Fathy, Marwa
    et al.
    El Nady, Jehan
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Ebrahim, Shaker
    Soliman, Moataz B.
    Kashyout, Abd El-Hady B.
    Quasi-solid-state Electrolyte for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Nanofiber PMA-PVDF and PMA-PVDF/PEG Membranes2016In: International Journal of Electrochemical Science, E-ISSN 1452-3981, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 6064-6077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel electrospun membranes quasi-solid electrolytes based on blends of polymethylacrylate (PMA) - polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and PMA-PVDF/PEG (polyethylene glycol) are prepared by electrospinning technique and applied as quasi-solid state electrolytes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The membranes are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The crystallinity obtained from the DSC data increased with the increase of PVDF wt% in PMA-PVDF blend and then decreased for the PMA-PVDF/PEG membranes. The fully interconnected porous structure of the host polymer membranes of PMA-PVDF (4: 6 wt%) exhibited a high electrolyte uptake reached to similar to 265% and an ionic conductivity of 2.1x10(-3) S cm(-1), which is increased to 406.3%, and 3.2 x 10(-3) S cm(-1), respectively for PMA-PVDF/PEG (4: 6: 4 wt%) membrane. DSSC is assembled by PMA-PVDF(4: 6 wt%) and attained an overall energy conversion efficiency of 6.6% at light intensity of 100 mW cm(-2). The presence of 4 w% PEG in the electrolyte membrane increased the energy conversion efficiency to 7 % giving a promise candidate for scaling up this type of DSSCs.

  • 29.
    Fornara, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Chiavarino, Annalisa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Qin, Jian
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    PLGA-PEG multifunctional nanoparticles for simultaneous drug delivery and imaging by MRI and fluorescence microscopy2012In: Technical Proceedings of the 2012 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Expo, NSTI-Nanotech 2012, 2012, p. 4-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work deals with the synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles based on biocompatible di-block copolymer (PLGA-PEG) via an emulsion-evaporation method. To enable their visualization, these nanoparticles can be loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and/or quantum dots for fluorescent microscopy. A therapeutic agent, Indomethacin, can also be loaded and released. The influence of synthesis parameters on nanoparticle size (in the range 70-150 nm) has been controlled to achieve specific cellular interactions avoiding possible immuno-response. These multifunctional nanoparticles possess excellent photoemission properties for fluorescent microscopy and enhanced contrast efficiency for T 2 MRI imaging compared to available agents used today. In-vitro experiments confirm the low cytotoxicity of such nanoparticles and their excellent visualization properties by MRI and fluorescence microscopy in cells and biological tissues.

  • 30.
    Fornara, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Recalenda, Alberto
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Qin, Jian
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Sugunan, Abhilash
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Fei, Ye
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Laurent, Sophie
    University of Mons.
    Muller, Robert
    University of Mons.
    Zou, Jing
    University of Tampere.
    Usama, Abo-RAmadan
    University of Helsinki.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Polymeric/inorganic multifunctional nanoparticles for simultaneous drug delivery and visualization2010In: Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, ISSN 0272-9172, E-ISSN 1946-4274, Vol. 1257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoparticles consisting of different biocompatible materials are attracting a lot of interest in the biomedical area as useful tools for drug delivery, photo-therapy and contrast enhancement agents in MRI, fluorescence and confocal microscopy. This work mainly focuses on the synthesis of polymeric/inorganic multifunctional nanoparticles (PIMN) based on biocompatible di-block copolymer poly(L,L-lactide-co-ethylene glycol) (PLLA-PEG) via an emulsion-evaporation method. Besides containing a hydrophobic drug (Indomethacin), these polymeric nanoparticles incorporate different visualization agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and fluorescent Quantum Dots (QDs) that are used as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and fluorescence microscopy together. Gold Nanorods are also incorporated in such nanostructures to allow simultaneous visualization and photodynamic therapy. MRI studies are performed with different loading of SPION into PIMN, showing an enhancement in T2 contrast superior to commercial contrast agents. Core-shell QDs absorption and emission spectra are recorded before and after their loading into PIMN. With these polymeric/inorganic multifunctional nanoparticles, both MRI visualization and confocal fluorescence microscopy studies can be performed. Gold nanorods are also synthesized and incorporated into PIMN without changing their longitudinal absorption peak usable for lased excitation and phototherapy. In-vitro cytotoxicity studies have also been performed to confirm the low cytotoxicity of PIMN for further in-vivo studies.

  • 31.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Fornara, Andrea
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Petersson, Karolina
    Imego AB.
    Johansson, Christer
    Imego AB.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Olsson, Eva
    Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Evolution of Structural and Magnetic Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications2010In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 2278-2284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the evolution of microstructure and magnetic properties of thermally blocked magnetite nanoparticles, aimed for immunoassay applications, during their synthesis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations of the size, size distribution, morphology, and crystal structure of particles reveal that particles at an early stage of the reaction process are either single crystals or polycrystals containing planar faults and they grow via a combination of reactant (monomer) consumption and oriented attachment at specific crystallographic surfaces because of the strong dipolar character of the < 111 > surfaces of magnetite. At a later stage of the synthesis reaction, the magnetic attraction strives to align contacting particles with their < 111 > axis of easy magnetization in parallel and this may also be an active driving force for crystal growth. At latter stages, the crystal growth is dominated by Ostwald ripening leading to smoother crystalline particles with a mean diameter of 16.7 +/- 3.5 nm and a narrow size distribution. The magnetic properties of the particles measured using static and dynamic magnetic fields are consistent with the evolution of particle size and structure and show the transition from superparamagnetic to thermally blocked behavior needed for magnetic relaxation-based immunoassay applications.

  • 32.
    Haghighi, Ehsan Bitaraf
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Accurate basis of comparison for convective heat transfer in nanofluids2014In: International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, ISSN 0735-1933, E-ISSN 1879-0178, Vol. 52, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal conductivity and viscosity of alumina (Al2O3), zirconia (ZrO2), and titania (TiO2) nanofluids (NFs) were measured at 20°C. All the NF systems were water based and contained 9wt.% solid particles. Additionally, the heat transfer coefficients for these NFs were measured in a straight tube of 1.5m length and 3.7mm inner diameter. Based on the results, it can be stated that classical correlations, such as Shah and Gnielinski, for laminar and turbulent flow respectively, can be employed to predict convective heat transfer coefficients in NFs, if the accurate thermophysical properties are used in the calculations. Convective heat transfer coefficients for NFs were also compared with those of the base fluids using two different bases for the comparison, with contradictory results: while compared at equal Reynolds number, the heat transfer coefficients increased by 8-51%, whereas compared at equal pumping power the heat transfer coefficients decreased by 17-63%. As NFs have higher viscosity than the base fluids, equal Reynolds number requires higher volumetric flow, hence higher pumping power for the NFs. It is therefore strongly suggested that heat transfer results should be compared at equal pumping power and not at equal Reynolds number.

  • 33.
    Hussein, Mohamed Ahmed Mohamady
    et al.
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Dermatol Clin, D-52074 Aachen, Germany.;Natl Res Ctr, Div Med Res, Dept Pharmacol, Cairo 12622, Egypt..
    Guler, Ece
    Marmara Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol & Biomat Applicat & Res NBUAM, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey.;Marmara Univ, Dept Pharmacol, Fac Pharm, TR-34716 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Rayaman, Erkan
    Marmara Univ, Dept Pharmaceut Microbiol, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Cam, Muhammet Emin
    Marmara Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol & Biomat Applicat & Res NBUAM, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey.;Marmara Univ, Dept Pharmacol, Fac Pharm, TR-34716 Istanbul, Turkey.;UCL, Dept Mech Engn, Torrington Pl, London W E 7JE, England..
    Sahin, Ali
    Marmara Univ, Sch Med, Dept Biochem, Genet & Metab Dis Res & Invest Ctr, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Grinholc, Mariusz
    Univ Gdansk, Intercollegiate Fac Biotechnol, Dept Biotechnol, Lab Mol Diagnost, Gdansk, Poland..
    Mansuroglu, Demet Sezgin
    Istanbul Arel Univ, Polymer Technol & Composite Applicat & Res Ctr Ar, TR-34537 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Sahin, Yesim Muge
    Istanbul Arel Univ, Polymer Technol & Composite Applicat & Res Ctr Ar, TR-34537 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Gunduz, Oguzhan
    Marmara Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol & Biomat Applicat & Res NBUAM, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH.
    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.
    Zewail City Sci & Technol, Ctr Mat Sci CMS, Nanomed Lab, Giza 12578, Egypt..
    Megahed, Mosaad
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Dermatol Clin, D-52074 Aachen, Germany..
    Dual-drug delivery of Ag-chitosan nanoparticles and phenytoin via core-shell PVA/PCL electrospun nanofibers2021In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 270, article id 118373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dual-drug delivery systems were constructed through coaxial techniques, which were convenient for the model drugs used the present work. This study aimed to fabricate core-shell electrospun nanofibrous membranes displaying simultaneous cell proliferation and antibacterial activity. For that purpose, phenytoin (Ph), a well-known proliferative agent, was loaded into a polycaprolactone (PCL) shell membrane, and as-prepared silver-chitosan nanoparticles (Ag-CS NPs), as biocidal agents, were embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) core layer. The morphology, chemical composition, mechanical and thermal properties of the nanofibrous membranes were characterized by FESEM/STEM, FTIR and DSC. The coaxial PVA-Ag CS NPs/PCL-Ph nanofibers (NFs) showed more controlled Ph release than PVA/PCL-Ph NFs. There was notable improvement in the morphology, thermal, mechanical, antibacterial properties and cytobiocompatibility of the fibers upon incorporation of Ph and Ag-CS NPs. The proposed core-shell PVA/PCL NFs represent promising scaffolds for tissue regeneration and wound healing by the effective dual delivery of phenytoin and Ag-CS NPs.

  • 34.
    Hussein, Mohamed Ahmed Mohamady
    et al.
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Dermatol Clin, D-52074 Aachen, Germany.;Natl Res Ctr, Med Res Div, Dept Pharmacol, Cairo 12622, Egypt..
    Su, Sena
    Marmara Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol & Biomat Applicat & Res NBUAM, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Ulag, Songul
    Marmara Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol & Biomat Applicat & Res NBUAM, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Wozniak, Agata
    Univ Gdansk, Intercollegiate Fac Biotechnol, Dept Biotechnol, Lab Mol Diagnost, PL-80307 Gdansk, Poland..
    Grinholc, Mariusz
    Univ Gdansk, Intercollegiate Fac Biotechnol, Dept Biotechnol, Lab Mol Diagnost, PL-80307 Gdansk, Poland..
    Erdemir, Goekce
    Istanbul Univ, Aziz Sancar Inst Expt Med, Dept Mol Med, TR-34390 Istanbul, Turkey.;Istinye Univ, Mol Canc Res Ctr ISUMKAM, TR-34010 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Erdem Kuruca, Serap
    Istanbul Univ, Fac Med, Dept Physiol, TR-34390 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Gunduz, Oguzhan
    Marmara Univ, Ctr Nanotechnol & Biomat Applicat & Res NBUAM, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey.;Marmara Univ, Fac Technol, Dept Met & Mat Engn, TR-34722 Istanbul, Turkey..
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH.
    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.
    Ctr Mat Sci CMS, Zewail City Sci & Technol, Nanomed Lab, Giza 12578, Egypt..
    Megahed, Mosaad
    Univ Hosp RWTH Aachen, Dermatol Clin, D-52074 Aachen, Germany..
    Development and In Vitro Evaluation of Biocompatible PLA-Based Trilayer Nanofibrous Membranes for the Delivery of Nanoceria: A Novel Approach for Diabetic Wound Healing2021In: Polymers, E-ISSN 2073-4360, Vol. 13, no 21, article id 3630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The attempts to explore and optimize the efficiency of diabetic wound healing's promotors are still in progress. Incorporation of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO(2)) in appropriate nanofibers (NFs) can prolong and maximize their promoting effect for the healing of diabetic wounds, through their sustained releases, as well as the nanofibers role in mimicking of the extra cellular matrix (ECM). The as-prepared nCeO(2) were analyzed by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM and FTIR, where TEM and SEM images of both aqueous suspension and powder showed spherical/ovoid-shaped particles. Biodegradable trilayer NFs with cytobiocompatibility were developed to sandwich nCeO(2) in PVA NFs as a middle layer where PLA NFs were electrospun as outer bilayer. The nCeO(2)-loaded trilayer NFs were characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR and DSC. A two-stage release behavior was observed when the nanoceria was released from the trilayer-based nanofibers; an initial burst release took place, and then it was followed by a sustained release pattern. The mouse embryo fibroblasts, i.e., 3T3 cells, were seeded over the nCeO(2)-loaded NFs mats to investigate their cyto-biocompatibility. The presence and sustained release of nCeO(2) efficiently enhance the adhesion, growth and proliferation of the fibroblasts' populations. Moreover, the incorporation of nCeO(2) with a higher amount into the designed trilayer NFs demonstrated a significant improvement in morphological, mechanical, thermal and cyto-biocompatibility properties than lower doses. Overall, the obtained results suggest that designated trilayer nanofibrous membranes would offer a specific approach for the treatment of diabetic wounds through an effective controlled release of nCeO(2).

  • 35. Jacquot, A.
    et al.
    Rull, M.
    Moure, A.
    Fernandez-Lozano, J. F.
    Martin-Gonzalez, M.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Jaegle, M.
    Anisotropy and inhomogeneity measurement of the transport properties of spark plasma sintered thermoelectric materials2013In: Thermoelectric Materials Research and Device Development for Power Conversion and Refrigeration: symposium held November 25-30, 2012, Boston, Mass, Materials Research Society, 2013, p. 89-95Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the development and capabilities of two new measurement systems developed at Fraunhofer-IPM. The first measurement system is based on an extension of the Van der Pauw method and is suitable for cube-shaped samples. A mapping of the electrical conductivity tensor of a Skutterudite-SPS samples produced at the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid is presented. The second measurement system is a ZTmeter also developed at the Fraunhofer-IPM. It enables the simultaneous measurement of the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity up to 900 K of cubes at least 5x5x5 mm 3 in size. The capacity of this measurement system for measuring the anisotropy of the transport properties of a (Bi,Sb)2Te3 SPS sample produced by KTH is demonstrated by simply rotating the samples.

  • 36.
    Jarahnejad, Mariam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Haghighi, Ehsan B.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nikkam, Nader
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Palm, Björn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Experimental investigation on viscosity of water-based Al2O3 and TiO2 nanofluids2015In: Rheologica Acta, ISSN 0035-4511, E-ISSN 1435-1528, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 411-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the influence of temperature, concentration, and size of nanoparticles, and addition of surfactants on dynamic viscosity of water-based nanofluids containing alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) nanoparticles. Two viscometers, a capillary and a falling ball, were used for the measurements in the temperature range of 20-50 A degrees C and the particle concentration of 3-14.3 wt.%. The results indicate that the viscosity of nanofluids is reduced by increasing the temperature, similar to their base fluids. Moreover, surfactants, which are used to improve the shelf stability of nanofluids, most likely increase their viscosity. The correlations derived from the linear fluid theory such as Einstein and Batchelor, especially for solid concentration above 1.5 wt.% are not accurate to predict viscosity of nanofluids, while the modified Krieger-Dougherty equation estimates viscosity of nanofluids with acceptable accuracy in a specific range of solid particle size to aggregate size.

  • 37.
    Khalil, Alaa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. Mechanical Engineering Department, Canadian International College, Fifth Settlement, New Cairo, Egypt.
    Nasser, W. S.
    Osman, T. A.
    Toprak, Muhammet Sadaka
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Surface modified of polyacrylonitrile nanofibers by TiO2/MWCNT for photodegradation of organic dyes and pharmaceutical drugs under visible light irradiation2019In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 179, article id 108788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the fabrication of two composite nanofibers systems containing polyacrylonitrile polymer (PAN), Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and Titania (TiO2) nanoparticles. Photodegradation experiments were performed to study the effect of various parameters including pH, catalyst dose, pollutant concentration and reaction time for three model compounds, methylene blue (MB), indigo carmine (IC), and ibuprofen (IBU) under visible light. Morphology and structure of the modified composite nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, Raman spectra, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) analyses. The photocatalytic performance was achieved in a rather short time visible light (&lt;30 min) and under low power intensity (125 W) compared to earlier reports. Kinetics data fitted well using pseudo-first order model to describe the mechanism of photocatalytic degradation processes. The stability and flexibility of the fabricated composite nanofibers allow their application in a continuous flow system and their re-use after several cycles.

  • 38.
    Khan, Abdullah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Johnsson, M.
    Han, L.
    Nong, N. V.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Fabrication, spark plasma consolidation, and thermoelectric evaluation of nanostructured CoSb32014In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, E-ISSN 1873-4669, Vol. 612, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured powders of thermoelectric (TE) CoSb3 compounds were synthesized using a chemical alloying method. This method involved co-precipitation of oxalate precursors in aqueous solution with controlled pH, followed by thermochemical treatments including calcination and reduction to produce stoichiometric nanostructured CoSb3. Moreover, CoSb3 nanoparticles were consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) with a very brief processing time. Very high compaction densities (>95%) were achieved and the grain growth was almost negligible during consolidation. An iterative procedure was developed to maintain pre-consolidation particle size and to compensate Sb evaporation during reduction. Significant changes in particle size and morphology were observed, and the post-reduction cooling was found to be an important stage in the process. The spark plasma sintering (SPS) parameters were optimized to minimize the grain growth while achieving sufficient densification. Grain sizes in the range of 500 nm to 1 mu m, with compaction density of 95-98% were obtained. Preliminary measurements of thermal diffusivity and conductivity showed the dependence on grain size as well as on porosity. TE transport properties were measured in the temperature range of 300-650 K. Sample showed p-type behavior with a positive Seebeck coefficient, which increases with increasing temperature. Electrical conductivity measurements indicate metallic behavior and it decreases with increasing temperature. Thermal conductivity also decreases with increasing temperature and major contribution is due to the lattice component. A TE figure of merit of 0.15 was achieved for high purity CoSb3 nanostructured TE material at 650 K and these results are comparable with the values reported for the best unfilled/undoped CoSb3 in the literature.

  • 39.
    Kunzmann, Andrea
    et al.
    Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Britta
    Clinical Allergy Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vogt, Carmen
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Feliu, Neus
    Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Gabrielsson, Susanne
    Clinical Allergy Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina
    Labortory for Materials, Biology Interactions, Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Testing and Research, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Laurent, Sophie
    NMR and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of General, Organic and Biomedical Chemistry, University of Mons, Belgium.
    Vahter, Marie
    Krug, Harald
    Division of Metals and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Insitutetet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Scheynius, Annika
    Clinical Allergy Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Universty Hospital Solan, Sweden.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Efficient internalization of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes by primary human macrophages and dendritic cells2011In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, E-ISSN 1096-0333, Vol. 253, no 2, p. 81-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineered nanoparticles are being considered for a wide range of biomedical applications, from magnetic resonance imaging to "smart" drug delivery systems. The development of novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of their biocompatibility. In this regard, particular attention should be paid to the possible interactions between nanoparticles and cells of the immune system, our primary defense system against foreign invasion. On the other hand, labeling of immune cells serves as an ideal tool for visualization, diagnosis or treatment of inflammatory processes, which requires the efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cells of interest. Here, we compare novel monodispersed silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with commercially available dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic properties. Furthermore, they were nontoxic to primary human monocyte-derived macrophages at all doses tested whereas dose-dependent toxicity of the smaller silica-coated nanoparticles (30 nm and 50 nm) was observed for primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not for the similarly small dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. No macrophage or dendritic cell secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed upon administration of nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were taken up to a significantly higher degree when compared to the dextran-coated nanoparticles, irrespective of size. Cellular internalization of the silica-coated nanoparticles was through an active, actin cytoskeleton-dependent process. We conclude that these novel silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising materials for medical imaging, cell tracking and other biomedical applications. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 40.
    Li, Jiantong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Vaziri, Sam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Lemme, Max C.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Östling, Mikael
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    A simple route towards high-concentration surfactant-free graphene dispersions2012In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 3113-3116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple solvent exchange method is introduced to prepare high-concentration and surfactant-free graphene liquid dispersion. Natural graphite flakes are first exfoliated into graphene in dimethylformamide (DMF). DMF is then exchanged by terpineol through distillation, relying on their large difference in boiling points. Graphene can then be concentrated thanks to the volume difference between DMF and terpineol. The concentrated graphene dispersions are used to fabricate transparent conductive thin films, which possess comparable properties to those prepared by more complex methods.

  • 41.
    Li, Jiantong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Vaziri, Sam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Lemme, Max C.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Östling, Mikael
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Efficient inkjet printing of graphene2013In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 25, no 29, p. 3985-3992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient and mature inkjet printing technology is introduced for mass production of coffee-ring-free patterns of high-quality graphene at high resolution (unmarked scale bars are 100 μm). Typically, several passes of printing and a simple baking allow fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin film transistors, and micro-supercapacitors.

  • 42.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Meng Lin, Meng
    Toprak, Muhammet S
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kim, Do Kyung
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nanocomposites of polymer and inorganic nanoparticles for optical and magnetic applications2010In: Nano reviews, ISSN 2000-5121, Vol. 1, p. 5214-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an up-to-date review on nanocomposites composed of inorganic nanoparticles and the polymer matrix for optical and magnetic applications. Optical or magnetic characteristics can change upon the decrease of particle sizes to very small dimensions, which are, in general, of major interest in the area of nanocomposite materials. The use of inorganic nanoparticles into the polymer matrix can provide high-performance novel materials that find applications in many industrial fields. With this respect, frequently considered features are optical properties such as light absorption (UV and color), and the extent of light scattering or, in the case of metal particles, photoluminescence, dichroism, and so on, and magnetic properties such as superparamagnetism, electromagnetic wave absorption, and electromagnetic interference shielding. A general introduction, definition, and historical development of polymer-inorganic nanocomposites as well as a comprehensive review of synthetic techniques for polymer-inorganic nanocomposites will be given. Future possibilities for the development of nanocomposites for optical and magnetic applications are also introduced. It is expected that the use of new functional inorganic nano-fillers will lead to new polymer-inorganic nanocomposites with unique combinations of material properties. By careful selection of synthetic techniques and understanding/exploiting the unique physics of the polymeric nanocomposites in such materials, novel functional polymer-inorganic nanocomposites can be designed and fabricated for new interesting applications such as optoelectronic and magneto-optic applications.

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  • 43.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhang, Shuo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    He, Zeming
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Stiewe, Christian
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Mueller, Eckhard
    Novel Solution Route Synthesis of Low Thermal Conductivity Nanocrystalline Bismuth Telluride2010In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 7658-7662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel synthesis approach based on a solution route has been developed for the fabrication of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride. The method consists of dissolving both bismuth and tellurium into the same organic solvent with the assistance of complexing agents and one-step coprecipitation of bismuth telluride. The synthesized nanocrystalline bismuth telluride powders possess rhombohedral crystal structure and are nanosheet/nanorod-like with an average size of between 30 and 40 nm. The thermal conductivity of the hot-pressed compact consolidated from the as-synthesized nanopowders is 0.39-0.45 Wm(-1)K(-1) in the temperature range of 323 to 523 K, which is at most one third of that of bulk bismuth telluride-based materials reported in the literature. Such low thermal conductivity of the investigated bismuth telluride is mainly attributed to substantially high concentration of grain boundaries provided by nanostructuring to scatter phonons intensively.

  • 44. Lin, Meng Meng
    et al.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kim, Hyung-Hwan
    Kim, Hyuck
    Lee, Hyung Bock
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Kim, Do-Kyung
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Complete separation of magnetic nanoparticles via chemical cleavage of dextran by ethylenediamine for intracellular uptake2010In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 444-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Completely water dispersible and highly monodispersed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were prepared. The surface of SPIONs was modified with dual-crosslinked amine activated dextran (AMD) and chemical cleavage of AMD on SPIONs was carried out by ethylenediamine hydrochloride (EDA). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that individual SPIONs were completely separated in water and the average diameter of resulting nanoparticles was 4.4 nm.

  • 45.
    Ma, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Wang, Xiaodi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Khalifa, Hassan Ahmed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Enhanced ionic conductivity in calcium doped ceria - Carbonate electrolyte: A composite2012In: International journal of hydrogen energy, ISSN 0360-3199, E-ISSN 1879-3487, Vol. 37, no 24, p. 19401-19406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, ceria-based nanocomposites, as a proton and oxygen ion conductor, has been developed as promising electrolyte candidates for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs). Up to now, samarium doped ceria (SDC) was studied as a main oxide for nanocomposite electrolyte; while calcium doped ceria (CDC) is considered as a good alternative from both material performance and economical aspects. Yet the conduction behavior of CDC-based composite has not been reported. In the present study, calcium doped ceria was prepared by oxalate co-precipitation method, and used for the fabrication of CDC/Na2CO3 composite. The thermal decomposition process, structure and morphology of the samples were characterized by TGA, XRD, SEM, etc. The oxygen ion conductivity of single phase CDC sample was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), while the proton and oxygen ion conductivity of CDC/Na2CO3 nanocomposite sample were determined by four-probe d.c. measurements. The CDC/Na2CO3 samples show significantly enhanced overall ionic conductivity compared to that of single phase CDC samples, demonstrating pronounced composite effect. This confirms that the use of nanocomposite as electrolyte can effectively lower the operation temperature of SOFC due to improved ionic conductivity.

  • 46.
    Ma, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Wang, Xiaodi
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Li, Shanghua
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Zhu, Bin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Samarium-doped ceria nanowires: Novel synthesis and application in low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells2010In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 22, no 14, p. 1640-1644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Samarium-doped ceria (SDC) nanowires are synthesized by a novel, template-, surfactant-free and cost-effective method, using citric acid as precipitating/complexing agent for formation of citrate precursor nanowires. The single SOFC based on SDC nanowires/Na2CO3 nanocomposites as electrolyte is f