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  • 1.
    Andersson, E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles.
    Stichel, Sebastian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles.
    Orvnäs, Anneli
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Rail Vehicles.
    Persson, R.
    Passenger Trains Division, Bombardier Transportation, Västerås, Sweden.
    How to find a compromise between track friendliness and the ability to run at high speed2012In: Civil-Comp Proceedings, ISSN 1759-3433, Vol. 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing and optimizing a rail vehicle there is a contradiction between, on the one hand, stability on straight track at high speed and, on the other hand, reasonable wheel and rail wear in small- and medium-radius curves. This paper describes the process of developing and optimizing a track-friendly bogie. A simulation model has been used to investigate dynamic stability on straight track at high speeds along with the wheel and rail wear in sharper curves. The result is a bogie with relatively soft wheelset guidance allowing passive radial self-steering, which in combination with appropriate yaw damping ensures stability on straight track at higher speeds. This bogie has been tested according to EN 14363 at speeds up to about 300 km/h and in curves with radii ranging from 250 m and up. 

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