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  • 1. Bendor, Roy
    et al.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Looking backward to the future:: On past-facing approaches to futuring2021In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the past is present in all futuring activities it tends to remain implicit and has not received adequate attention by futures scholars and practitioners. In response, this conceptual paper offers a novel framework with which the past can be brought into futures studies in a structured and comprehensive way. We begin by providing a brief account of how the past already figures in futures studies as part of efforts to understand the lingering effects of the past on the future; as part of a drive for ontological pluralization; and as a way to augment more mainstream futuring exercises. We then introduce two past-facing approaches to futuring, recasting and pastcasting, and illustrate their symmetry with the more familiar future-facing approaches, forecasting and backcasting. The symmetry, we argue, is based on shared aims and a shared style of inquiry. We then compare the different approaches and illustrate the landscape of futuring as an interplay of two dimensions: the focus of the activity on outcomes or pathways, and the stakes involved in it.

  • 2.
    Biørn-Hansen, Aksel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring the Use of a Carbon Footprint Calculator Challenging Everyday Habits2022In: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon calculators have been put forth as a tool to motivate sustainable behaviour change in people. However, the approach of “just” presenting numbers to communicate climate footprints has not been found to be an effective strategy. In this paper, we investigate the use of an application that combines carbon footprint calculations with gamelike features in order to address the gap between awareness and behaviour. Our results are based on an interview study and show that while respondents appreciate the idea, there are several problem areas which have implications for the design of carbon calculators, including issues with targeting the “right users”, the use of gamification and the absence of a social context. Furthermore, the results point towards general barriers and opportunities for design when the aim is to design for sustainable behaviour change. This includes a need to be adaptive to the transitioning process towards a low carbon lifestyle.  

     

  • 3.
    Biørn-Hansen, Aksel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Robért, Markus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Exploring the Problem Space of CO2 Emission Reductions from Academic Flying2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 21, p. 12206-12206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CO2 emissions from aviation have been predicted to increase over the coming decades. Within the academic world, flying is often perceived to be a necessary prerequisite to being a successful researcher. Many Swedish universities have ambitious climate goals, but are simultaneously among the top emitters in the public sector. Reaching stated climate goals could feasibly be met through a combination of measures, including decreased flying. One way to address the challenge is to support behavioural interventions with the help of interactive visualizations of CO2 emissions from flying. Those few examples that exist in the research literature are generally directed towards management and are less applicable to universities, given the large autonomy researchers enjoy and their discretionary control of research project funds. This paper uses a design-oriented research approach to present an analysis of the problem space at the intersection of interactive visualizations using air travel data to reduce CO2 emissions from business air travel at our own university, KTH Royal Institute of Technology. Through a number of design experiments, evaluations and investigations, we have unearthed needs, challenges and opportunities for the creation of visualization tools to support more sustainable travel practices at universities and in other knowledge-intensive organisations.

  • 4.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The sharing economy as the commons of the 21st century2017In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to make a contribution to the debate on how contemporary collaborative commons, as part of the wider sharing economy, can be understood and supported. Three cases of contemporary commons are analysed: a DIY bike repair studio, a pop-up home office concept and Wikipedia. The article shows how the design principles developed for governing natural resource commons are only partly applicable to these contemporary commons. It also illustrates the differences in these types of commons in terms of the nature of the resource being shared, scarcity, barriers to entry and how rules are formulated and upheld.

  • 5.
    Brooks, Ian
    et al.
    University of the West of England.
    Laurell Thorslund, Minna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Biørn-Hansen, Aksel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Somova, Elena
    University of Plovdiv.
    #Tech4Bad: when do we say no?2021In: ITNOW, ISSN 1746-5702, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Existing IT systems are enabling company activities that are unsustainable and damaging to the environment. ‘When should we as IT professionals stop maintaining them?’ ask Ian Brooks MBCS, Minna Laurell Thorslund, Aksel Biørn-Hansen and Elena Somova.

  • 6.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Diminishing space: peer-to-peer sharing as a transition practice2020In: ICT4S2020: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability / [ed] Ana Moreira, Benoit Combemale, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020, p. 220-226Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A regenerative thriving future within limits will require a change of social practices. Such a change will however not come by itself, and it is safe to state that computing in different forms and shapes will be critical. In this paper we evaluate a start-up in the form of an online platform supporting peer-to-peer storage space rentals. We will present and analyse their service and discuss the current and future prospects for systems in this genre, in light of the transition to a post-carbon future society. The analysis is grounded in a user study evaluating the system in its current form. We argue that services like the one offered by these types of companies could function as a type of 'transition service' in the sense that they are perhaps an interim self-obviating system that enable people to get accustomed to a new way of thinking about current unsustainable practices (in this case storage practices and sharing of storage), but eventually might become unnecessary/superfluous as a new ecology of storage practices comes into place. Hence, it might be important for these services and the companies behind them to prepare for this eventuality, for example by diversifying their business offer.

  • 7.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ringenson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Sustainable Playable City: Making Way for the Playful Citizen2020In: Making Smart Cities More Playable: Exploring Playable Cities / [ed] Anton Nijholt, Singapore: Springer Nature , 2020, p. 87-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To play is a legitimate need of urban citizens, and it is therefore important to enable play in cities and to plan for making cities playable. The playable city is not dependent on the digital technologies offered by the smart city. The playable city “happens” when a city offers suitable (playful) affordances and citizens engage in and make use of them. This ultimately implies that also ‘non-smart’ cities can be playable (and may indeed already be so). In this chapter we explore the intersection of playable and sustainable cities. We argue that the playable city can be placed within the realm of what the sustainable city should be and should aim for. The issue of whether this is achieved by applying digital technologies thus becomes decentred, even though digital technologies at the same time could open up for new and exciting possibilities. Key is to ensure that the playable city is a sustainable city and we should therefore aim for designing and building sustainable playable cities.

  • 8.
    Cerratto-Pargman, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    University of California Irvine.
    The internet at the eco-village: Performing sustainbility in the twenty-first century2016In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the digital infrastructure and its footprint an ideological blind spot for recently emerging ecological communities, including eco-villages? This paper examines how a group of people who are concerned with environmental issues such as peak oil and climate change are orchestrating a transition toward a more sustainable and resilient way of living. We studied a Swedish eco-village, considering how computing in this community contributes to defining what alternative ways of living might look like in the twenty-first century. Drawing on a social-ecological perspective, the analysis illustrates, on the one hand, that the Internet, along with the digital devices we use to access it, capitalizes and mobilizes values, knowledge and social relationships that in turn enhance resilience in the eco-village. On the other hand, the analysis shows that an explicit focus on ecological values is not sufficient for a community of individuals to significantly transform Internet use to conform to ecological ideals. This work contributes to a deeper understanding of the imbrication of social technologies with practices that are oriented to perform sustainable and resilient ways of living.

  • 9. Clear, Adrian
    et al.
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Towards a social practice theory perspective on sustainable HCI research and design2018In: Digital Technology and Sustainability / [ed] Mike Hazas and Lisa Nathan, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Comber, Rob
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lampinen, Airi
    Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haapoja, Jesse
    Aalto University Espoo, Finland.
    Towards post-interaction computing: Addressing immediacy, (un)intentionality, instability and interaction effects2019In: Halfway to the Future Symposium: Proceedings of the Halfway to the Future Symposium 2019a, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id 3363477Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    xThe changes that have come about through the increased speed, ubiquity, and scale of computational systems require a reconceptualisation of how we think about and study the relationship between humans and computers. Driven by the increased production of data in interaction and the transfer of value from interaction to data, we argue that computing that fundamentally impacts human-computer relations is no longer happening only in interaction but also without and outside interaction. While recent arguments have highlighted interaction as a problematic concept for HCI — challenging what constitute users, use, the human, and the computer in interaction — we propose post-interaction computing as one means to conceptualise a fourth wave of HCI. We propose four concepts — immediacy, (un)intentionality, interaction effects, and instability — that can help us in identifying and slicing our objects of analysis in new ways that better match the challenges that HCI is now faced with.

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  • 11.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bardzell, Jeffrey
    Hazas, Mike
    Muller, Michael
    Announcing a new CHI subcommittee: critical and sustainable computing2020In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 101-103Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Comber, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Computing as Ecocide2023In: Ninth Computing within Limits 2023, PubPub , 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental impact of computing is significant, distributed, and extensive. In this paper, we examine the extent to which this implies that computing, as an industry and as specific technologies, infrastructures, and practices, can be considered as ecocide. Ecocide is a proposed crime of environmental damage. A significant movement is underway to register ecocide as the fifth law of the International Criminal Court. We examine the definition of ecocide proposed and evaluate computing across the criteria established. Our intention with this paper is not to provide definitive proof, one way or the other, but to raise the question of the extent to which we can consider, be accountable for, and take responsibility for the environmental harm we create as designers of computing technologies. We argue that the establishment of ecocide as an international crime will have significant effects for computing in how we assume and consume natural resources in the advancement of computing, and that a paradigm shift is needed to recognise and account for nature as an equal participant in computing’s future and development.

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    fulltext
  • 13. Deng, J.
    et al.
    Wang, Y.
    Velasco, C.
    Altarriba Altarriba Bertran, F.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Obrist, M.
    Isbister, K.
    Spence, C.
    Floyd'mueller, F.
    The Future of Human-Food Interaction2021In: Proceedings CHI '21: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Virtual Event / Yokohama Japan, May 8-13, 2021, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing interest in food within the HCI discipline, with many interactive prototypes emerging that augment, extend and challenge the various ways people engage with food, ranging from growing plants, cooking ingredients, serving dishes and eating together. Grounding theory is also emerging that in particular draws from embodied interactions, highlighting the need to consider not only instrumental, but also experiential factors specific to human-food interactions. Considering this, we are provided with an opportunity to extend human-food interactions through knowledge gained from designing novel systems emerging through technical advances. This workshop aims to explore the possibility of bringing practitioners, researchers and theorists together to discuss the future of human-food interaction with a particular highlight on the design of experiential aspects of human-food interactions beyond the instrumental. This workshop extends prior community building efforts in this area and hence explicitly invites submissions concerning the empirically-informed knowledge of how technologies can enrich eating experiences. In doing so, people will benefit not only from new technologies around food, but also incorporate the many rich benefits that are associated with eating, especially when eating with others.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Systems Thinking Exercises in Computing Education:: Broadening the Scope of ICT and Sustainability2020In: ICT4S2020: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability / [ed] Ana Moreira, Benoit Combemale, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 170-176Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating sustainability in computing education entails broadening the scope of the education, but how can that be done while maintaining student engagement? Climate change and species extinction can appear far removed from data structures and algorithms to say the least. In our ongoing work of integrating sustainability in our Media Technology programme, we have addressed this gap by introducing systems thinking games and activities to broaden the scope, as well as by situating the issues addressed in the course in relation to their future profession. In this paper, we present our experiences of introducing and playing systems thinking games, how the systems thinking exercise sessions were conducted, outcomes of the sessions and finally some lessons learnt. Furthermore, we present and analyse changes we did to the exercises and that led to a richer material for discussions in the classroom.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Julia, Creutz
    Cybercom Group.
    Hasselqvist, Hanna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sustainable IT Business in the Making: An exploratory case study2019In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, Lappeenranta, Finland, June 10-14, 2019. / [ed] Annika Wolff, 2019, Vol. 2382Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Businesses have historically had a negative impact on the environment by contributing to pollution, the increase of greenhouse emissions, neglection of responsible waste disposal, and deforestation among other things. In this paper we present an exploratory case study of an IT consultancy firm and their perspective and work with sustainable development. As a consultancy firm, the company does not provideservices directly to end users, but rather help clients in their business efforts. The aim with this project has been to explore how sustainability concerns can be integrated into the work processes of an IT consultancy firm, exploring both opportunities and challenges.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    ICT4S Reaching Out: Making sustainability relevant in higher education2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many media technology and computer science engineering students suffer from the preconceived opinion that sustainability is at best peripheral, and at worst irrelevant to their education. In this paper we discuss our experiences of integrating sustainability and ICT4S into a media technology engineering programme. An overarching tension has been in finding a balance between teaching about sustainability in general, and teaching about ICT4S in particular. Furthermore, what aspects of the wide and interdisciplinary area of ICT4S are most relevant to teach to media technology students, and how can the connection between ICT and sustainability be “refined”, clarified and expressed We explicate how we have gone about to shape the course in such a way that it becomes both relevant and possible for these students to relate to it, and we exemplify with choices made, of which one had been the implementation and adaption of the GaSuCo board game. While the results presented here are primarily relevant to media technology and computer science educations, we also conclude with recommendations to the larger ICT4S community. We argue that the ICT4S community does not only need to take part in developing education in this area, but also needs to conduct research on how to educate students in ICT4S.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Meeting the future in the past-using counterfactual history to imagine computing futures2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future is inherently hard to predict, yet we know there are various factors that will limit the future of computing (scarcity of materials, energy shortages and various biophysical limits) in both substantial and disruptive ways. When we look at the past and at mainstream projected computing futures, all we see is exponential growth. While it is easy to reject such trajectories, it is much harder to imagine and propose credible, preferable and evocative alternatives. Breaking away from default modes of thinking about computing is difficult but possible, and we here present a methodology-counterfactual history-that can help us imagine alternative scenarios for computing. We argue that by learning from counterfactual pasts ("what-if scenarios"), we can more easily liberate our ideas from various preconceptions that hamper them and box them in. This makes it possible to generate and entertain a more diverse "portfolio" of ideas about the future and help us better prepare for meeting future challenges.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the inherent contradictions of teaching sustainability at a technical university2017In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the Paradox, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the necessity of rocking the boat Computers and digitalization have greatly shaped our world and are now an unavoidable part of modern society. Weiser’s (1991) vision of ubiquitous computing has in many respects not only been met but has in affluent parts of the world been surpassed (Bell & Dourish, 2007). Digital artifacts and devices surround us and have invisibly and seamlessly permeated everything we do. Our modern societies are however not sustainable. We have overstepped several planetary boundaries and risk overstepping several more (Steffen et al., 2015). We are about to reach limits as to the resources we can extract from the earth (Bardi, 2014), and the changes wreaked are by now so profound that they will likely last for a geological period of time (Steffen et al., 2007). In light of this, it is of utmost importance to strive towards a sustainable society, and this is a responsibility that falls on many disciplines and sectors. We believe that engineering students could be key drivers in this change since many will eventually enter positions of power from which they will make decisions that will shape our future society. 

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Robèrt, Markus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the Necessity of Flying and of not Flying:: Exploring how Computer Scientists Reason about Academic Travel2020In: ICT4S2020: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability / [ed] Ana Moreira, Benoit Combemale, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 18-26Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to fulfill the Paris agreement, we need to drastically reduce carbon emissions globally. 2020 is a pivotal year in this endeavour as many projections indicate that emissions need to decrease significantly before 2030. This challenge pertains to all parts of society, including (computer science) researchers. This however clashes with the fact that flying to a large extent has become built-in to the everyday practices of research and of academic life. It is feasible to imagine that computer scientists could fly less than other academics since we ought to be innovators and early adopters of computer-mediated alternatives such as video-conferencing and other forms of digital meeting technologies. It is however also possible that we fly more because conferences might be a more dominant outlet for publications in our field in comparison to other research fields. At KTH Royal Institute of Technology, the researchers at the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) fly the most. In this paper, we present initial qualitative results from a survey regarding travel that was answered by computer scientists at EECS. We are in particular analysing the free text answers in order to understand how computer scientists1 reason about their own flying and about the alternatives. It will be hard to fulfil the Paris agreement without decreasing flying significantly, but this requires us to rethink how we do research, and how we travel (or not) within academia. This paper contributes with knowledge about the perceived barriers and drivers for computer scientists to decrease their flying.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Peters, Anne-Kathrin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning, Learning in Stem.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Laurell Thorslund, Minna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sjöö, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Addressing Students’ Eco-anxiety when Teaching Sustainability in Higher Education2022In: Proceedings - 2022 International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, ICT4S 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2022, p. 88-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread awareness and the sense of urgency and helplessness regarding the ongoing sustainability crisis (climate change, biodiversity loss etc.) can evoke feelings of grief, sorrow, despair and anxiety. Those emotions are seldom discussed in computing or in computing education. They can have detrimental effects on the well-being of students and others, and also lead to inaction. But concern can on the other hand also be a catalyst for learning. In this paper, we present results and reflections from a research and development project in our introductory course to sustainability and ICT focusing on emotions in sustainability education. We focus on “eco-anxiety” and ask: 1) How is eco-anxiety communicated by students and teachers?, 2) In what ways do students receive support to deal with eco-anxiety? and 3) What could be done to better address eco-anxiety in computing education? We here present an analysis of how we have responded to the phenomenon of eco-anxiety, what activities have been added to the course and an evaluation of these interventions. The results are based on joint reflections that have been guided by literature, a small-scale ethnographic study as well as a course evaluation. The paper will end with recommendations for other ICT4S educators on how they can start addressing eco-anxiety in their education.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Wolrath Söderberg, Maria
    Södertörn.
    Wormbs, Nina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Exceptionalism and Evasion: How Scholars Reason About Air Travel2022In: Academic Flying and the Means of Communication / [ed] Kristian Bjørkdahl & Adrian Santiago Franco Duharte, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 159-183Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how scholars reason about their own flying habits is important when dealing with the problems of large emissions from academic air travel. This study is based on a travel habits survey with scholars at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. KTH has relatively high emissions from air travel, but at the same time, it has a high profile in matters of sustainability and a lot of research related to this theme. One can therefore assume a high degree of knowledge about the climate crisis and the climate impact of various actions. It is also plausible that KTH scholars meet special expectations to be role models and that practices in conflict with their teaching can have consequences for the public confidence in the university. In this study, we look at how scholars reason about how emissions from their flying could be reduced. Their responses display a spectrum of varying attitudes, from climate scepticism to a commitment to radical transformation, with the majority in between, either suggesting different types of concrete changes or invoking arguments to justify the status quo. The proposed interventions, several of which are ingenious and wise, can guide university managements to strategies that have support from employees. The more reluctant arguments point to cultural and discursive habits that must be understood and met in an empathetic way. 

  • 22. Green, Nicola
    et al.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kuznesof, Sharron
    A Digital Nexus: Sustainable HCI and Domestic Resource Consumption2020In: The Oxford Handbook of Digital Technology and Society / [ed] S. J. Yates & R. E. Rice, Oxford University Press, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hadjigeorgiou, E.
    et al.
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Nat & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, England..
    Clark, B.
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Nat & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, England..
    Simpson, E.
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Nat & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, England..
    Coles, D.
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Nat & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, England..
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fischer, A. R. H.
    Wageningen Univ, Mkt & Consumer Behav Grp, 1 Hollandseweg, NL-6706KN Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Meijer, N.
    Wageningen Food Safety Res, Akkermaalsbos 2, NL-6708 WB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Marvin, H. J. P.
    Wageningen Food Safety Res, Akkermaalsbos 2, NL-6708 WB Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Frewer, L. J.
    Newcastle Univ, Sch Nat & Environm Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, England..
    A systematic review into expert knowledge elicitation methods for emerging food and feed risk identification2022In: Food Control, ISSN 0956-7135, E-ISSN 1873-7129, Vol. 136, p. 108848-, article id 108848Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An emerging risk results "... from a newly identified hazard to which a significant exposure may occur, or from an unexpected new or increased significant exposure and/or susceptibility to a known hazard". In the field of emerging food and feed risks, expert knowledge elicitation methodologies represent important tools for identifying and addressing data gaps associated with emerging risk identification, particularly under conditions of risk uncertainty and/or ambiguity. A systematic review was conducted to identify expert knowledge elicitation methods which have been used in the context of emerging food and feed risks. The primary research questions were which existing expert knowledge elicitation methodologies have been used to study emerging food and feed risks? and what contexts or situations have been studied using expert knowledge elicitation methodologies in relation to emerging food and feed-related risks? Three databases were searched: Web of Science Core Collection, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Searches covered all studies published from 1998 onwards. A total of 59 studies were included in the review following the application of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Given the heterogeneity of the included studies, a thematic analysis was applied to assess these papers in relation to the research questions. There was no one expert knowledge elicitation method consistently adopted for the identification of a specific type of emerging food and feed risk. Method triangulation was observed in 23 studies and was reported to improve the validity of results in 15 of these. Most published research considered emerging risks associated with societal controversy ("ambiguous risks"). Although the use of methodological triangulation appears to be helpful in relation to understanding emerging food and feed risks, future research into the development of a harmonised framework will enable the identification, processing, and evaluation of emerging food risks in a systemic way which can facilitate comparative analysis and harmonise mitigation strategies to address emerging risks and their drivers.

  • 24.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A Systematic Review of Digital Behaviour Change Interventions for More Sustainable Food Consumption2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 9, article id 2638Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food production and consumption present major sustainability challenges, and finding ways to reduce the environmental impact of food, for example through behavioural changes by consumers, is becoming increasingly important. In recent years, digital interventions have become important tools to change behaviours in many areas. In this review, we evaluate the status of current scientific knowledge of digital behaviour change interventions for sustainable food consumption practices. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for how to conduct systematic reviews, we searched multiple databases for papers containing terms related to food, sustainability and digital behaviour change interventions. Only studies where the digital interventions were actually implemented and evaluated from a behaviour change perspective were included, resulting in 15 primary studies in the final review. The quality of the studies was evaluated from a behaviour change perspective, and the approaches used were categorised using two intervention frameworks, the Behaviour Change Wheel and the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1. The results show that all of the included studies had major quality issues when evaluated from a behaviour change perspective. This means that we could not find any evidence regarding whether the digital behaviour change interventions examined worked or not. Most studies further lacked theoretical grounding or a clear approach to how or why they should be effective for behaviour change for more sustainable food consumption practices. Our main recommendation for future research in the field is to expand from the current exploratory phase to conducting scientifically rigorous studies of higher quality, more thoroughly grounded in behaviour change theory and methods. Furthermore, based on our study, we suggest changes to the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1.

  • 25. Heitlinger, S.
    et al.
    Bryan-Kinns, N.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Connected seeds and sensors: Co-designing internet of things for sustainable smart cities with urban food-growing communities2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a case study of a participatory design project in the space of sustainable smart cities and Internet of Things. We describe our design process that led to the development of an interactive seed library that tells the stories of culturally diverse urban food growers, and networked environmental sensors from their gardens, as a way to support more sustainable food practices in the city. This paper contributes to an emerging body of empirical work within participatory design that seeks to involve citizens in the design of smart cities and Internet of Things, particularly in the context of marginalised and culturally diverse urban communities. It also contributes empirical work towards non-utilitarian approaches to sustainable smart cities through a discussion of designing for urban diversity and slowness.

  • 26.
    Heitlinger, Sara
    et al.
    City Univ London, Dept Comp Sci, London, England..
    Bryan-Kinns, Nick
    Queen Mary Univ London, Media & Arts Technol CDT, London, England..
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Right to the Sustainable Smart City2019In: CHI 2019: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2019 CHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS, ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concerns have driven an interest in sustainable smart cities, through the monitoring and optimisation of networked infrastructures. At the same time, there are concerns about who these interventions and services are for, and who benefits. HCI researchers and designers interested in civic life have started to call for the democratisation of urban space through resistance and political action to challenge state and corporate claims. This paper contributes to an emerging body of work that seeks to involve citizens in the design of sustainable smart cities, particularly in the context of marginalised and culturally diverse urban communities. We present a study involving co-designing Internet of Things with urban agricultural communities and discuss three ways in which design can participate in the right to the sustainable smart city through designing for the commons, care, and biocultural diversity.

  • 27.
    Höök, Kristina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sustainable practices for the academic business sector: publish in journals such as TOCHI2020In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 99-100Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28. Knowles, B.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Deviant and guilt-ridden: Computing within psychological limits2015In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this position paper we discuss a set of problems particular to computing within limits that draws on psychological and sociological barriers. The enormity of the predicaments we are facing, global climate change and resource scarcity, together with the social, cultural and national settings in which we are facing these predicaments, are seriously hampering our possibility to address them. We argue that without confronting the underlying psychology that perpetuates our current state of un-sustainability, there is little computing can hope to achieve. Furthermore, we also argue that these psychological limits to computing do not only concern the users of our systems, often portrayed as the people in need of behavioral change, but also ourselves, as researchers within computing. In this paper we start exploring what these psychological limits could be, what ideas computing for sustainability has tried but should now retire, and start discussing a way forward.

  • 29. Lampinen, Airi
    et al.
    McGregor, Moira
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Member-Owned Alternatives: Exploring Participatory Forms of Organising with Cooperatives2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 2573-0142, Vol. 2, no CSCW, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cooperatives are member-owned organisations, run for the common benefit of their members. While cooperatives are a longstanding way of organising, they have received little attention in CSCW. In this paper, through interviews with 26 individuals from 24 different cooperatives, our focus is an exploratory inquiry on how cooperatives could expand thinking into what future economies can look like and the part technologies may play in them. We discuss (1) the work to make the co-op work, that is, the special effort involved in managing an enterprise in a democratic and inclusive way, (2) the multiple purposes that cooperatives can serve for their members, well beyond financial benefit, and (3) ICT usage within cooperatives as a site of tension and dialogue. We conclude by discussing the meaning and measures of success in alternative economies, and lessons learned for CSCW scholarship on civic and societal organisations.

  • 30.
    Laurell Thorslund, Minna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Svensson-Höglund, Sahra
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From (e-)wasteland to Repair Society: Exploring ICT repair through speculative scenarios2022In: Proceedings - 2022 International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, ICT4S 2022, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2022, p. 179-189Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circularity in how we handle resources and materials is a key ambition in many sustainability initiatives and policies. Yet, when it comes to the circularity of ICT, much research tends to focus on how raw materials are sourced and later recycled. E-waste has represented the fastest growing waste stream globally for years, and the vast majority is not handled appropriately. In a society where repair is possible, accessible and the normative response to the breakage of devices, this waste stream could be dramatically reduced. In this paper, we describe and discuss the results of a literature review of how repair of ICT has been approached in the proceedings of previous ICT4S conferences (2013–2020). The findings are then analysed in relation to a set of speculative future Repair Society scenarios, which were developed to inform policy recommendations. The paper contributes to the ICT4S community by: 1) identifying aspects of ICT repair that have been studied to date; 2) using the Repair Society scenarios to generate insights and reflect on gaps in the research; and 3) outlining insights and suggestions of areas that could fruitfully be explored by the ICT4S community in future research.

  • 31.
    Lindrup, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Biørn-Hansen, Aksel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Data Physicalization: From Theory to Practice2023In: Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI23), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Lindrup, Martin
    et al.
    Aalborg Univeristy.
    Menon, Arjun Rajendran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Biørn-Hansen, Aksel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Carbon Scales: Collective Sense-making of Carbon Emissions from Food Production through Physical Data Representation2023In: DIS '23: Proceedings of the 2023 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2023, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The climate impact of our food consumption is a key issue to sustainability. Yet understanding the food system and the impact it has can be difficult given its abstract nature. In this paper, we report on a Research through Design project aimed at designing and evaluating a data physicalization for supporting collective sense-making of the climate impact of food. Throughout the design process, we have explored the materiality of CO2 emissions and ways to design with less resource use. The resulting data physicalization, Carbon Scales, was evaluated in a three-week field study with 27 participants. Our findings show that collective sense-making can be enabled through interactive data physicalizations and that this can lead to carbon literacy. We expand on a) sustainability through design by arguing for the value of artifacts that let people stay in the interaction as this can support collective sense-making and b) sustainability in design by showcasing the value of designing with an interaction-first and materials-second mindset.

  • 33.
    Lundström, Anton
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Developing a framework for evaluating the sustainability of computing projects2017In: LIMITS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 Workshop on Computing Within Limits, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017, p. 111-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toyama [19] has proposed a "preliminary taxonomy" for classifying computing projects as a way of separating sustainable computing efforts from unsustainable ones. In this paper we explore the feasibility of Toyama's taxonomy. We begin by describing how we revised and developed his taxonomy to make it more practically useful and then conducted a pilot study where we used the revised version to evaluate four computing projects. The pilot study was then used as a foundation for further discussing and developing the revised taxonomy into yet another, third and final version which we have chosen to call the Sustainable Computing Evaluation Framework (SCEF). While our proposed framework (SCEF) is more practically useful than Toyama's "preliminary taxonomy", there are still challenges that need to be addressed and we end the paper by suggesting where future efforts could be focused.

  • 34.
    Menon, Arjun Rajendran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    From Smart IoT Ecosystems to 'Living' IoT Ecosystems2021In: CEUR Workshop Proceedings, CEUR-WS , 2021, p. 6-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While IoT and smart products have exploded onto the market in the past few years, these are typically designed from a data-driven, resource management approaches and as automation enablers. We propose a new approach to IoT ecosystems by using animistic narratives that visualise homes and cities as living entities, with IoT products as a means for them to both interact with inhabitants and to express themselves. Using design fiction, we explore the potentialities for this approach, through fictional scenarios involving a private local space such as a home.

  • 35.
    Menon, Arjun Rajendran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Expanding Affective Computing Paradigms Through Animistic Design Principles2021In: Human-Computer Interaction, Interact  2021, PT I / [ed] Ardito, C Lanzilotti, R Malizia, A Petrie, H Piccinno, A Desolda, G Inkpen, K, Springer Nature , 2021, Vol. 12932, p. 115-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animistic and anthropomorphic principles have long been investigated along with affective computing in both HCI and HRI research, to reduce user frustration and create more emotive yet relatable devices, robots, products and artefacts. Yet such artefacts and research have mainly been from user-centric perspectives and the animistic characteristics localised to single objects. In this exploratory paper, we take these principles in a new direction by attempting to invoke animistic characteristics of a room or a space itself. Designing primarily for space itself rather than the user or a single product, allows us to create new interactions and narratives that can induce animism and empathy for the space, in users. This leads to the creation of a prototype space, which we use to investigate how users approach, interact and behave in such a space, yielding several insights and user behaviour, all of which can be used for further studies, capable of generating new interaction perspectives and providing insights into user behaviour. We conclude by discussing the potentiality of such spaces in developing new strategies for behaviour change and HCI.

  • 36.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Tomlinson, Bill
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Informat Management, Wellington, New Zealand..
    Patterson, Donald J.
    Westmont Coll, Dept Math & Comp Sci, Santa Barbara, CA USA..
    Chen, Jay
    NYU Abu Dhabi, Dept Comp Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Raghavan, Barath
    Univ Southern Calif, Comp Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    Calif State Univ Long Beach, Dept Comp Engn & Comp Sci, Long Beach, CA 90840 USA..
    Computing within Limits2018In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 86-93Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COMPUTING RESEARCHERS AND practitioners are often seen as inventing the future. As such, we are implicitly also in the business of predicting the future. We plot trajectories for the future in the problems we select, the assumptions we make about technology and societal trends, and the ways we evaluate research. However, a great deal of computing research focuses on one particular type of future, one very much like the present, only more so. This vision of the future assumes that current trajectories of ever-increasing production and consumption will continue. This focus is perhaps not surprising, since computing machinery as we know it has existed for only 80 years, in a period of remarkable industrial and technological expansion. But humanity is rapidly approaching, or has already exceeded, a variety of planet-scale limits related to the global climate system, fossil fuels, raw materials, and biocapacity. (28,32,38) It is understandable that in computing we would not focus on limits. While planetary limits are obvious in areas such as extractive capacity in mining or fishing,

  • 37.
    Norton, Juliet
    et al.
    University of California, Irvine.
    Raturi, Ankita
    University of California, Irvine.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    University of California, Irvine.
    Prost, Sebastian
    Open Lab, Newcastle University, UK.
    McDonald, Samantha
    University of California, Irvine.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bates, Oliver
    Lancaster University.
    Normark, M.
    Tomlinson, B.
    Herbig, N.
    Dombrowski, L.
    A grand challenge for HCI: Food + sustainability2017In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Panzone, Luca A
    et al.
    School of Natural and Environmental Science, Newcastle University, UK.
    Sniehotta, Falko F
    Faculty of Behavioural, Management and Social sciences, University of Twente, The Netherlands.
    Comber, Rob
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lemke, Fred
    Vlerick Business School, Ghent University, Belgium.
    The effect of traffic-light labels and time pressure on estimating kilocalories and carbon footprint of food.2020In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 155, article id 104794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food consumption decisions require consumers to evaluate the characteristics of products. However, the literature has given limited attention to how consumers determine the impact of food on health (e.g., kilocalories) and on the environment (e.g., carbon footprint). In this exercise, 1511 consumers categorised 43 food products as healthy/unhealthy and good/bad for the environment, and estimated their kilocalories and carbon footprint, which were known to the investigator. The task was performed either with no stimuli (a control group), under time pressure only, with traffic-light labels only, or both. Results show that traffic-light labels: 1) operate through improvements in knowledge, rather than facilitating information processing under pressure; 2) improve the ability to rank products by both kilocalories and carbon footprint, rather than the ability to use the metric; 3) reduce the threshold used to categorise products as unhealthy/bad for the environment, whilst raising the threshold used to classify products as good for the environment (but not healthy). Notably, traffic-light increase accuracy by reducing the response compression of the metric scale. The benefits of labels are particularly evident for carbon footprint. Overall, these results indicate that consumers struggle to estimate numerical information, and labels are crucial to ensure consumers make sustainable decisions, particularly for unfamiliar metrics like carbon footprint.

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  • 39.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the limits of limits2015In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper outlines the connection between the perceived urgency of environmental and resource challenges that humanity is facing during the twenty-first century and the individual researcher's response within the emerging "Computing within Limits" community. What is the relationship between our beliefs as individuals and as researchers and the specific issues we chose to study? Furthermore, is there a relationship between skills and topics we happen to be expert in and the subsequent future scenarios we plan for and deem to be more likely to happen?.

  • 40.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Biørn-Hansen, Aksel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Robèrt, Markus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    From Moore's Law to the Carbon Law2020In: ICT4S 2020: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on ICT for Sustainability, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2020, p. 285-293Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In society in general and within computing in particular, there has, and continues to be, a focus on faster, cheaper, better etc. Such perspectives clash with the fact that impeding climate change and the need for radically decreased CO2 emissions (c.f. the Paris Agreement) will have fundamental and far-reaching ramification for computing and for all other sectors of society during the coming decades. In the call for the first Computing within Limits workshop, it was stated that "A goal of this community is to impact society through the design and development of computing systems in the abundant present for use in a future of limits and/or scarcity."There have since been several contributions to Computing within Limits that have accepted the challenge of discussing and imagining what such systems as well as what "a future of limits and/or scarcity"could look like. Despite this, there is currently no consensus about what exactly such a future entails and the community can consequently only offer hazy ideas about exactly what systems we should strive to design and develop. The basic problem can be summed up as follows: we know that fundamental changes are necessary and will come, but we still struggle with envisioning what a post-growth/decarbonising society looks like and what computing systems need to be designed and developed for use in such futures, or, to support that transition. In this paper we argue that the work of imagining an actionable "future of limits"could benefit from using the "carbon law"as a starting point. The carbon law is based on work in the environmental sciences and we exemplify how it can be used to generate requirements that can guide the development of computing systems for a future of limits. While these lessons are general, we exemplify by describing a research project that aims to support the KTH Royal Institute of Technology's goal of-in line with the carbon law-radically reducing CO2 emissions from academic flying over the next decade. We give examples of how computing can aid in this task, including by presenting visualisation tools that we have developed to support the KTH carbon abatement goals. We also discuss the role of computer science in general and of Computing within Limits in particular in supporting the transition to a more sustainable (or at least a less unsustainable) future.

  • 41.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    “It’s not fair!”: making students engage in sustainability2013In: Proceedings of the EESD13 Conference, Cambridge, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we address the issue of teaching a subject, sustainability, that ideally should permeate the whole engineering education, but at the moment often plays a minor role in the curriculum. Here we discuss the tactics of planning and conducting a sustainability course with the explicit goal of truly engaging the students and making an impact on their thinking. Furthermore, we here present a framework that can be used in course planning and analysis. Finally, we discuss how this framework was used in our sustainability course for Media Technology engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and the engagement and resulting change in students perception of sustainability. Moreover, we argue that beyond rethinking the engineer and the engineering education, we also need to rethink our roles as university teachers.

  • 42.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bates, Oliver
    Univ Lancaster, Sch Comp & Commun, Lancaster LA1 4WA, England..
    Kirman, Ben
    Univ York, Dept Theatre Film & Televis, York YO10 5GB, N Yorkshire, England..
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedman, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    van den Broeck, Martijn
    Umeå Univ, Umeå Inst Design, Fac Sci & Technol, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    The future of computing and wisdom: Insights from Human-Computer Interaction2019In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 113, article id UNSP 102434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a structured report on a dialogue on the Future of Computing and Wisdom. The dialogue consists of a recorded and transcribed discussion between researchers and practitioners in the field of Human-Computer Interaction that was held at workshop in conjunction with the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction in September 2018. However, the dialogue also encompasses workshop participants' preparatory work with writing "fictional abstracts" - abstracts of yet-to-be-written research papers that will be published in 2068. The polyvocal dialogue that is reported upon thus includes not just the voices of researchers and practitioners who attended the workshop, but also includes the voices of the future researchers of 2068 who wrote the abstracts in question as well as the voices of the organisms, individuals, intelligent agents and communities who are the subjects, victims, beneficiaries and bystanders of wise (or unwise) future computing systems.

  • 43.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kirman, Ben
    University of York, York, UK.
    Bates, Oliver
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    The futures of computing and wisdom2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - NordiCHI ’18, ACM Press, 2018, p. 960-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in discussing the consequences of the technologies we invent and study in HCI. Whether it is climate change, ethical computing, capitalist and neo-liberal models of commerce and society, grassroots movements, big data or alternative paradigms in distributed systems, this workshop will invite participants to explore these consequences and ask how we move forward with responsibility and new forms of knowing and knowledge. We invite participants to join us, as we cast forward fifty years to 2068 to imagine the future of wisdom, and to reflect on how we got there. By writing Fictional Abstracts, an abstract from a research paper yet to be written, we will unpick critical tensions in the advancement of computing over the next decades. The workshop will develop perspectives on the futures of computing and critically reflect on the assumptions, methods, and tools for enabling (and disabling) such futures.

  • 44.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hook, Mikael
    Tanenbaum, Joshua
    Pufal, Marcel
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    What if there had only been half the oil?: Rewriting history to envision the consequences of peak oil2017In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 31, p. 170-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is unequivocal evidence that we are facing the greatest energy transition since the dawn of the industrial age. We need to urgently shift from a global fossil fuel and CO2-emitting energy system to 1) decrease our CO2 emissions and combat the effects of climate change and 2) face a future of depleting fossil fuel resources. Yet there is still a lack of collective action to start taking effective measures to meet these challenges. We argue that there is a need for narratives in general and for a special type of narrative in particular, allohistorical scenarios, that act as thought experiments whose main function is to defamiliarize us with what is taken for granted. Such scenarios invite us to explore plausible parallel paths, thereby making it possible to imagine futures that are essentially different from the path-dependence of an unyielding historical past. Such futures enable us to grapple with a present that is saturated by the inertia of past decisions and the sunken costs of existing infrastructure. We here present the design rationale for the Coalworld scenario: an alternative world where only half the oil ever existed. We also describe the methodology and the assumptions that underlie the Coalworld scenario.

  • 45.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Inst. Swedish ICT, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Preist, Chris
    University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Håkansson, Maria
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Knowles, Bran
    Lancaster Univ., Lancaster, UK.
    Is there a European strand of sustainable HCI?2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2014, p. 809-812Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has been an established topic at the main CHI conference since 2007. It has, however, not been an equally prominent theme at the NordiCHI conference. It is now time to establish Sustainable HCI as an important and prominent topic also at NordiCHI.

  • 46.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Palme, Jacob
    Stockholm University.
    ASCII imperialism2009In: Standards and Their Stories: How Quantifying, Classifying, and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life / [ed] Lampland, Martha och Leigh Star, Susan, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009, p. 177-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Raghavan, Barath
    Introduction to LIMITS ’15: First workshop on computing within limits2015In: First Monday, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Raghavan, Barath
    ICSI/De Novo.
    Rethinking sustainability in computing: From buzzword to non-negotiable limits2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2014, p. 638-647Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a flurry of work on sustainable computing and sustainable HCI, but it is unclear whether this body of work adheres to a meaningful definition of sustainability. In this paper, we review four interlocking frameworks that together provide a rigorous foundation for what constitutes sustainability. Each consecutive framework both builds upon and can loosely be seen as a refinement of the previous framework. More specifically, we leverage prominent ecological thinking from outside of computer science to inform what sustainability means in the context of computing. To this end, we re-evaluate some recent results from the field of sustainable HCI and offer thoughts on further research in the field.

  • 49.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ringenson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Börjesson Rivera, Miriam
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Schmitz, Lisa
    KTH.
    Krinaki, Maria
    KTH.
    Prekratic, Nino
    KTH.
    Lundkvist, Björn
    KTH.
    Smart magic city run: Exploring the implications of public augmented reality games2018In: 9th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies for Interactive Entertainment, INTETAIN 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 215, p. 151-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an augmented reality smart city gaming concept, Magic Run. Magic Run has entertainment value and fulfills its’ original brief, but several aspects of the game were found to be problematic during a workshop with smart city researchers. We present problematic aspects of the game as well as ideas for how to redesign the game to control or ameliorate problematic interaction between future smart city players and bystanders.

  • 50.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    HCI in a World of Limitations: Addressing the Social Resilience of Computing2013In: Post-Sustainability - A CHI 2013 Sustainability Community Workshop, 2013, Vol. 27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most computer scientistsand practitioners assume that we live in a world of possibilities and that inexorable forces of technological development will help bring us a future of increased wellbeing and of growing economic prosperity. An increasing number of scientists however point at the triple crisis(ecology, economy, energy) and imagine radically different futures based not on expansion and possibilities, but on limitations and/or decline. We propose that a broad program should be formulated that takes biophysical and economic limitations as its starting point and outline some areas that are paramount for HCI to come to grips with.

12 1 - 50 of 61
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